Learn Psychology


                                    

Learn Psychology


Learn Psychology
































Welcome to the learn psychology for free page. From here you will be able to access an incredible array of psychology related learning materials.

The reason that you can now learn psychology for free is that an increasing number of psychologists, psychology lecturers and academic institutions are disseminating their ideas, research and course materials through a creative commons license. The aim of this page, therefore is to showcase only the very best and most comprehensive freely available educational materials.

With this in mind, this main page presents an outstanding Introduction to Psychology course delivered by Professor Paul Bloom from Yale University. Whether you teach psychology, are new to psychology, currently studying or thinking about studying psychology, you will find the material featured below as interesting as it is invaluable.

Links to other quality learn psychology resources will be added in due course.




Yale University Psychology




Background Information

Open Yale Courses provide lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public free of charge. Each course includes a full set of class lectures produced in high-quality video accompanied by such other course materials as lecture transcipts and suggested readings. As with all the Open Yale Courses, the introduction to psychology course is designed for a wide range of people around the world, among them self-directed and life-long learners, educators, and high school and college students.

Course Description

What do your dreams mean? Do men and women differ in the nature and intensity of their sexual desires? Can apes learn sign language? Why can’t we tickle ourselves? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of thought and behavior. It explores topics such as perception, communication, learning, memory, decision-making, religion, persuasion, love, lust, hunger, art, fiction, and dreams. We will look at how these aspects of the mind develop in children, how they differ across people, how they are wired-up in the brain, and how they break down due to illness and injury.

Course Leader: Professor Paul Bloom

Paul Bloom is a professor of psychology at Yale University. His research explores how children and adults understand the physical and social world, with special focus on morality, religion, fiction, and art. He has won numerous awards for his research and teaching. He is past-president of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and co-editor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, one of the major journals in the field.

Dr. Bloom has written for scientific journals such as Nature and Science, and for popular outlets such as The New York Times, the Guardian, and the Atlantic. He is the author or editor of four books, including How Children Learn the Meanings of Words , and, most recently, Descartes' Baby: How the Science of Child Development Explains What Makes Us Human

The above information is taken from Dr. Bloom's Personal Home Page. For more information on Dr. Bloom, you can visit his Yale Psychology Faculty page by Clicking Here

Course Texts

Gray, Peter. Psychology

Marcus, Gary, ed. The Norton Psychology Reader


Learn Psychology Lecture 1: Introduction

Professor Paul Bloom welcomes students and presents the course as a comprehensive introduction to the study of the human mind. Course readings and requirements are discussed. The five main branches of psychology are presented: neuroscience, which is a study of the mind by looking at the brain; developmental, which focuses on how people grow and learn; cognitive, which refers to the computational approach to studying the mind; social, which studies how people interact; and clinical, which examines mental health and mental illnesses.

Lecture 1 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 1

Stanovich, Keith. "How to Think Straight about Psychology." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 27-37

Learn Psychology Lecture 2: Foundations: This Is Your Brain

This learn psychology lecture introduces students to two broad theories of how the mind relates to the body. Dualism is the ubiquitous and intuitive feeling that our conscious mind is separate from our physical bodies, whereas Materialism is the idea that all of our mental states are caused by physical states of the brain. This lecture reviews arguments explaining why materialism has become the predominant theory of mind in psychology. This discussion is followed by a basic overview of the neurophysiology of the brain.

Lecture 2 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 133-167

Damasio, Antonio R. "Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 58-69

Sacks, Oliver. "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 70-79

Learn Psychology Lecture 3: Foundations: Freud

This learn psychology lecture introduces students to the theories of Sigmund Freud, including a brief biographical description and his contributions to the field of psychology. The limitations of his theories of psychoanalysis are covered in detail, as well as the ways in which his conception of the unconscious mind still operate in mainstream psychology today.

Lecture 3 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 558-563, 632-637

Freud, Sigmund. "The Unconscious." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 12-17

Learn Psychology Lecture 4: Foundations: Skinner

Professor Bloom opens with a brief discussion of the value and evolutionary basis of unconscious processing. The rest of this lecture introduces students to the theory of Behaviorism, particularly the work of prominent behaviorist, B. F. Skinner. Different types of learning are discussed in detail, as well as reasons why behaviorism has been largely displaced as an adequate theory of human mental life.

Lecture 4 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 4

Chomsky, Noam. "A Review of B. F. Skinner's Verbal Behavior." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 129-145

Watson, John B. and Rosalie Rayner. "Conditional Emotional Reactions." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 117-129

Learn Psychology Lecture 5: What Is It Like to Be a Baby: The Development of Thought

This learn psychology lecture explores issues and ideas related to the branch of psychology known as cognitive development. It begins with an introduction of Piaget who, interested in the emergence of knowledge in general, studied children and the way they learn about the world in order to formulate his theories of cognitive development. This is followed by an introduction to the modern science of infant cognition. Finally, the question of the relationship between and the existence of different kinds of development is addressed.

Lecture 5 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 11

Gopnik, Alison, Patricia Kuhl, and Andrew Meltzoff. "The Scientist in the Crib: Minds, Brains, and How Children Learn." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 146-153

Learn Psychology Lecture 6: How Do We Communicate?: Language in the Brain, Mouth and the Hands

One of the most uniquely human abilities is the capacity for creating and understanding language. This lecture introduces students to the major topics within the study of language: phonology, morphology, syntax and recursion. This lecture also describes theories of language acquisition, arguments for the specialization of language, and the commonalities observed in different languages across cultures.

Lecture 6 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 11

Pinker, Steven. "The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 97-107

Baker, Mark C. "The Atoms of Language: The Mind's Hidden Rules of Grammar." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 108-114

Learn Psychology Lecture 7: Conscious of the Present; Conscious of the Past: Language (cont.); Vision and Memory

This learn psychology lecture finishes the discussion of language by briefly reviewing two additional topics: communication systems in non-human primates and other animals, and the relationship between language and thought. The majority of this lecture is then spent on introducing students to major theories and discoveries in the fields of perception, attention and memory. Topics include why we see certain visual illusions, why we don't always see everything we think we see, and the relationship between different types of memory.

Lecture 7 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapters 8 and 9

Hoffman, Donald D. "Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 81-90

Hughes, Howard C. "Sensory Exotica: A World Beyond Human Experience." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 91-95

Schacter, Daniel L. "Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 165-176

Learn Psychology Lecture 8: Conscious of the Present; Conscious of the Past: Vision and Memory (cont.)

In this learn psychology lecture, Professor Bloom reviews the basic psychological research on memory. Specific topics covered include the different memory types, memory limitations, strategies that improve memory, and memory disorders. This lecture also includes a discussion of several important social implications for memory research, such as recovered memories, and the influence of suggestibility on eyewitness testimony.

Lecture 8 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapters 8 and 9

Hoffman, Donald D. "Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 81-90

Hughes, Howard C. "Sensory Exotica: A World Beyond Human Experience." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 91-95

Schacter, Daniel L. "Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 165-176

Learn Psychology Lecture 9: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Love (Guest Lecture by Professor Peter Salovey)

Guest lecturer Peter Salovey, Professor of Psychology and Dean of Yale College, introduces students to the dominant psychological theories of love and attraction. Specific topics include the different types of love, the circumstances that predict attraction, and the situations where people mistakenly attribute arousal for love.

Lecture 9 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 456-458

Learn Psychology Lecture 10: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Evolution and Rationality

This learn psychology lecture introduces students to the study of psychology from an evolutionary perspective, the idea that like the body, natural selection has shaped the development of the human mind. Prominent arguments for and against the theory of natural selection and its relationship to human psychology are reviewed. Students will hear several examples of how studying mental phenomenon from an evolutionary perspective can help constrain theories in psychology as well as explain many prevalent human instincts that underlie many of our most basic behaviors and decisions.

Lecture 10 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 61-68, 345-351

Pinker, Steven. "How the Mind Works." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 39-44

Learn Psychology Lecture 11: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Emotions, Part I

This class is an introduction to the evolutionary analysis of human emotions, how they work, why they exist, and what they communicate. In particular, this lecture discusses three interesting case studies, that of happiness (e.g., smiling), fear and the emotions we feel towards our relatives. Finally, this lecture ends with a brief discussion of babies' emotional responses to their caregivers.

Lecture 11 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 61-68, 345-351

Pinker, Steven. "How the Mind Works." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 39-44

Learn Psychology Lecture 12: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Emotions, Part II

Professor Bloom continues the discussion of emotions as useful evolutionary adaptations for dealing with our social environment. In particular, this lecture describes evolutionary explanations for several important emotional responses, such as the love between parents and their offspring, the gratitude we feel towards cooperative behaviors, the spite we feel for cheaters, and the cultural differences in feelings of revenge.

Lecture 12 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 68-75, 212-223, 522-527

Ekman, Paul. "Emotions Revealed: Recognizing Faces and Feelings to Improve Communication and Emotional Life." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 245-254

Midterm Exam

At this point of the course students had to undertake a Midterm Exam, if you would like to have a go at the exam yourself, you can do so by Clicking Here

The answers to the exam can be found Here

Learn Psychology Lecture 13: Why Are People Different?: Differences

Why are people different from one another? This lecture addresses this question by reviewing the latest theories and research in psychology on two traits in particular: personality and intelligence. Students will hear about how these traits are measured, why they may differ across individuals and groups, and whether they are influenced at all by one's genes, parents or environment.

Lecture 13 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 49-61, 362-380, 423-444, 538-557

Herrnstein, Richard J. and Charles Murray. "The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 188-198

Harris, Judith Rich. "The Nurture Assumptions: Why Children Turn Out the Way They Do." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 291-303

Gladwell, Malcolm. "Personality Plus." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 304-316

Learn Psychology Lecture 14: What Motivates Us: Sex

This learn psychology lecture reviews what evolutionary theories and recent studies in psychology can tell us about sex and gender differences. Students will hear how psychology can help explain many of the differences that exist in whom we find attractive, what we desire in a mate, and sexual orientation.

Lecture 14 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), pp. 76-82, 195-201

Angier, Natalie. "Woman: An Intimate Biography." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 255-262

Learn Psychology Lecture 15: A Person in the World of People: Morality

Professor Bloom provides an introduction to psychological theories of morality. Students will learn how research in psychology has helped answer some of the most central questions about human morality. For instance, which emotions are "moral" and why did these moral feelings evolve? What factors guide our moral judgments? And what factors predict when good people will do bad things?

Lecture 15 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 14

Cialdini, Robert B. "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 265-272

Learn Psychology Lecture 16: A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part I

This is the first of two learn psychology lectures on social psychology, the study of how we think about ourselves, other people, and social groups. Students will hear about the famous "six degrees of separation" phenomenon and how it illuminates important individual differences in social connectedness. This lecture also reviews a number of important biases that greatly influence how we think of ourselves as well as other people.

Lecture 16 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 13

Lecture 17: A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part II; Some Mysteries: Sleep, Dreams, and Laughter

This lecture begins with the second half of the discussion on social psychology. Students will learn about several important factors influencing how we form impressions of others, including our ability to form rapid impressions about people. This discussion focuses heavily upon stereotypes, including a discussion of their utility, reliability, and the negative effects that even implicit stereotypes can incur.

The second half of the lecture introduces students to two prominent mysteries in the field of psychology. First, students will learn what is known and unknown about sleep, including why we sleep, the different types of sleep, disorders, and of course, dreams, what they are about and why we have them. Second, this half reviews how laughter remains a mysterious and interesting psychological phenomenon. Students will hear theories that attempt to explain what causes us to laugh and why, with a particular emphasis on current evolutionary theory.

Lecture 17 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 16

Learn Psychology Lecture 18: What Happens When Things Go Wrong: Mental Illness, Part I (Guest Lecture by Professor Susan Nolen-Hoeksema)

Professor Susan Nolen-Hoeksema describes how modern clinical psychology both identifies and treats various mental disorders. Particular focus is placed upon mood disorders such as bipolar disorder and depression, including current diagnostic criteria and current practices for treatment.

Lecture 18 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 16

Nasar, Sylvia. "A Beautiful Mind: The Life of Mathematical Genius and Nobel Laureate John Nash." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 343-348

Jamison, Kay Redfield. "An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 349-357

Learn Psychology Lecture 19: What Happens When Things Go Wrong: Mental Illness, Part II

This lecture continues to cover one of the most salient areas within the field of psychology known as psychopathology, or clinical psychology. Following a discussion of the different ways of defining mental illness, Professor Bloom reviews several classes of clinical diagnoses including schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, and personality disorders. The lecture concludes with a brief introduction to therapy.

Lecture 19 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Gray, Peter. Psychology (5th edition), chapter 16

Kramer, Peter D. "Listening to Prozac: A Psychiatrist Explores Antidepressant Drugs and the Remaking of the Self." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 366-379

Beck, Aaron T. "Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 380-386

Learn Psychology Lecture 20: The Good Life: Happiness

The last lecture in the course wraps up the discussion of clinical psychology with a discussion of treatment efficacy. Does therapy actually work? Professor Bloom summarizes the different types of influences that clinical interventions might have on people who receive therapy.

Professor Bloom ends with a review of one of the most interesting research topics in "positive psychology," happiness. What makes us happy? How does happiness vary across person and culture? What is happiness for? Students will hear how the most recent research in psychology attempts to answer these questions and learn how people are surprisingly bad at predicting what will make them happiest.

Lecture 20 PowerPoint Slides

Reading Assignment

Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. "Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 210-222

Sapolsky, Robert M. "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers: An Updated Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping." In The Norton Psychology Reader. Edited by Gary Marcus. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. pp. 223-232

Final Exam

If you would like to have a go at the final exam yourself, you can do so by Clicking Here

Please note that the answers are not available (but I'm sure you don't need them anyway!).
























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