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Psychology Blog





The All About Psychology Blog will be used to alert readers to all the latest content and resources added to the website.

It will also document a significant person, event or landmark in the history of psychology every day of the year.





Gustav Theodor Fechner: Today in the History of Psychology (19th April 1801)




Gustav Theodor Fechner was born. A renowned philosopher and physicist, Fechner's lifelong interest in psychophysics - the quantitative study of the relationship between physical stimuli and the psychological sensations and perceptions they induce - had an integral influence on the development of experimental psychology.

Rightly considered a founder of modern psychology Fechner's papers were bequeathed to Wilhelm Wundt following his death in 1887.

See following link to learn all about the history of psychology.

History of Psychology

Broca's Area: Today in the History of Psychology (18th April 1861)




French physician, anatomist and surgeon Pierre Paul Broca performed an autopsy on Louis Victor Leborgne. Monsieur Leborgne more commonly known as 'Tan' due to the fact that this was just about the only word he could say is one of the most important patients in the history of neuropsychology.

Having autopsied Leborgne's brain, Broca reported that he had discovered an abnormality in the left frontal lobe and concluded that this must be the patient's cortical speech production center; a part of the brain that would subsequently become known as 'Broca's area.'

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

Hippolyte Bernheim: Today in the History of Psychology (17th April 1840)




Hippolyte Bernheim was born. An eminent French neurologist and early mentor of Sigmund Freud, Bernheim was appointed professor of clinical medicine at Nancy in 1879 where he helped pioneer the study and application of hypnotism within psychotherapy.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

Albert Hofmann: Today in the History of Psychology (16th April 1943)




Eminent Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann experienced the first ever LSD-induced 'acid trip.' Hoffman synthesized lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in 1938 but was unaware of its powerful hallucinogenic properties until he accidentally absorbed a small amount of the drug, the effects of which he described as follows.

'...affected by a remarkable restlessness, combined with a slight dizziness. At home I lay down and sank into a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition, characterized by an extremely stimulated imagination. In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors.'

Huge research interest in the clinical, psychological and psychiatric applications of LSD followed Hofmann's discovery; however, moral panic over its recreational use and concern over potential adverse psychiatric reactions led to a wide scale ban of LSD by the late 1960's.

In 2014 a study by Peter Gasser et al published in The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease entitled 'Safety and Efficacy of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide-Assisted Psychotherapy for Anxiety Associated With Life-threatening Diseases' concluded that 'when administered safely in a methodologically rigorous medically supervised psychotherapeutic setting, LSD can reduce anxiety, suggesting that larger controlled studies are warranted.' This was the first controlled trial of LSD in more than 40 years.

Max Wertheimer: Today in the History of Psychology (15th April 1880)




Max Wertheimer was born. A founding figure within Gestalt psychology, Wertheimer's landmark paper 'Experimentelle Studien über das Sehen von Bewegung' (Experimental Studies of the Perception of Movement) ranks among the most important publications in the history of psychology.

This hugely influential paper is where Wertheimer first describes the phi phenomenon - the illusion of motion between stationary objects when presented rapidly in succession. Wertheimer's work in this area revolutionized the study of perception within psychology.

See following link to read 'Gestalt Theory' by Max Wertheimer in full for free! A classic text in the history of Gestalt Psychology.

Gestalt Theory

Edward C. Tolman: Today in the History of Psychology (14th April 1886)




Edward C. Tolman was born. A pioneering researcher within the field of learning theory and motivation, Tolman is best known for introducing "purposive behaviorism" his own brand of behaviorist inquiry which emphasized the role of cognition within the learning process.

Edward C. Tolman served as president of the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1937 and received the APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions in 1957.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

Martha E. Bernal: Today in the History of Psychology (13th April 1931)




Martha E. Bernal was born. In 1962 Bernal earned a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Indiana University and in doing so became the first woman of Mexican descent to receive a PhD in psychology in the USA.

During the course of a very successful career Martha E. Bernal made a telling contribution to several areas of research, including human psychophysiology, Latino psychology and minority mental health issues.

See following link to learn about some of the most eminent women in the history of psychology.

Eminent Women in Psychology

Alan Kent Malyon: Today in the History of Psychology (12th April 1941)




Alan Kent Malyon was born. A highly respected clinical psychologist, Malyon was a founding figure within the field of lesbian and gay psychology. In 1986 he served as chair of the American Psychological Association Committee on Lesbian and Gay Concerns during which time he set in place enduring initiatives to ensure that gay and lesbian issues were addressed within mainstream psychology.

Of all Malyon's many accomplishments arguably his greatest was his successful campaign to have 'egodystonic homosexuality' removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; a watershed moment in challenging misinformation about homosexuality.

Freud and Jung: Today in the History of Psychology (11th April 1906)




The legendary correspondence between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung began with a short letter from Freud which read:

Dear colleague,

Many thanks for sending me your Diagnostic Association Studies, which in my impatience I had already acquired. Of course your latest paper 'Psychoanalysis and Association Experiments' pleased me most, because in it you argue on the strength of your own experience that everything I have said about the hitherto unexplored fields of our discipline is true. I am confident that you will often be in a position to back me up, but I shall also gladly accept correction.

Yours sincerely, DR FREUD

See following links for Freud and Jung information and resources.

Sigmund Freud

Carl Jung

All About Psychology

A psychology website designed to help anybody looking for detailed information and resources.

Continue reading "All About Psychology"

Best Psychological Movies

A great collection of psych movies suggestions.

Continue reading "Best Psychological Movies"

To Boost Your Self-Esteem, Write About Chapters Of Your Life

Great article exploring the psychological benefits of 'life review therapy'.

Continue reading "To Boost Your Self-Esteem, Write About Chapters Of Your Life"

Freud Versus Jung: A Bitter Feud Over The Meaning of Sex

Freud versus Jung. Excellent article on the rise and fall of the friendship between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung.

Continue reading "Freud Versus Jung: A Bitter Feud Over The Meaning of Sex"

Acting Like An Extravert Has Benefits, But Not For Introverts

Excellent article on research into the positive and negative consequences of extraverted behavior.

Continue reading "Acting Like An Extravert Has Benefits, But Not For Introverts"

Think Direct Eye Contact Makes Someone Trustworthy?

Fascinating article on experimental research into direct eye contact within a competitive environment.

Continue reading "Think Direct Eye Contact Makes Someone Trustworthy?"




Recent Articles

  1. Gustav Theodor Fechner: Today in the History of Psychology (19th April 1801)

    Apr 19, 19 10:00 AM




    Gustav Theodor Fechner was born. A renowned philosopher and physicist, Fechner's lifelong interest in psychophysics - the quantitative study of the relationship between physical stimuli and the psycho…

    Read More

  2. Broca's Area: Today in the History of Psychology (18th April 1861)

    Apr 18, 19 10:00 AM




    French physician, anatomist and surgeon Pierre Paul Broca performed an autopsy on Louis Victor Leborgne. Monsieur Leborgne more commonly known as 'Tan' due to the fact that this was just about the onl…

    Read More

  3. Hippolyte Bernheim: Today in the History of Psychology (17th April 1840)

    Apr 17, 19 10:00 AM




    Hippolyte Bernheim was born. An eminent French neurologist and early mentor of Sigmund Freud, Bernheim was appointed professor of clinical medicine at Nancy in 1879 where he helped pioneer the study a…

    Read More


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