Anxiety Disorders Causes


                                


Must Have FREE Resource For Therapists

                            Psychology Programs

24 Essential Tools for Treating Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety Disorders Information provided courtesy of The National Institute of mental Health.


Anxiety Disorders Causes






















(Image via www.time-to-change.org.uk)



Current Understanding


In exploring the causes of anxiety disorders researchers are looking at the role genes play and the effects of environmental factors such as pollution, physical and psychological stress, and diet. In addition, studies are being conducted on the "natural history" (what course the illness takes without treatment) of a variety of individual anxiety disorders, combinations of anxiety disorders, and anxiety disorders that are accompanied by other mental illnesses such as depression.

Scientific findings suggests that, like heart disease and type 1 diabetes, mental illnesses are complex and probably result from a combination of genetic, environmental, psychological, and developmental factors. For instance, although National Institute of mental Health-sponsored studies of twins and families suggest that genetics play a role in the development of some anxiety disorders, problems such as PTSD are triggered by trauma.



The Role of The Brain


Several parts of the brain are key actors in the production of fear and anxiety. Using brain imaging technology and neurochemical techniques, scientists have discovered that the amygdala and the hippocampus play significant roles in most anxiety disorders.

The amygdala is an almond-shaped structure deep in the brain that is believed to be a communications hub between the parts of the brain that process incoming sensory signals and the parts that interpret these signals. It can alert the rest of the brain that a threat is present and trigger a fear or anxiety response. The emotional memories stored in the central part of the amygdala may play a role in anxiety disorders involving very distinct fears, such as fears of dogs, spiders, or flying.

The hippocampus is the part of the brain that encodes threatening events into memories. Studies have shown that the hippocampus appears to be smaller in some people who were victims of child abuse or who served in military combat. Research will determine what causes this reduction in size and what role it plays in the flashbacks, deficits in explicit memory, and fragmented memories of the traumatic event that are common in PTSD.



Future Understanding


By learning more about how the brain creates fear and anxiety, scientists may be able to devise better treatments for anxiety disorders. For example, if specific neurotransmitters are found to play an important role in fear, drugs may be developed that will block them and decrease fear responses; if enough is learned about how the brain generates new cells throughout the lifecycle, it may be possible to stimulate the growth of new neurons in the hippocampus in people with PTSD.

Current research on anxiety disorders includes studies that address how well medication and behavioral therapies work in the treatment of OCD, and the safety and effectiveness of medications for children and adolescents who have a combination of anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.




Note To Mental Health Professionals: Psychologist, Dr. Lawrence E. Shapiro, Ph.D., recently published an excellent FREE E-Book designed to be used by therapists treating clients with anxiety disorders. You can download this must have resource for free by clicking HERE.


Click Here To Download For Free
































Back To Top Of The Page

Go Back To The Main Mental Health Page

Go Back To The Home Page


                                

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.